1. Skip to content

Insight Blog | May, 2019

May, 2019

Posted: Tue, 28 May 2019 11:00 by Thomas Lawley

May madness

May madness

Welcome to fourth edition of the insight blog. Read on as we look back on all the goings on in May.

Herefordshire and Worcestershire Impact reports

The first of our impact reports for the districts across Herefordshire and Worcestershire has been released this past month. These impact reports will be a helpful resource for local organisations, providing key information to help support potential funding bids with easily accessible key stats.

An overview of some key stats of the report are as follows. Over 80% of Herefordshire residents are satisfied with the local area as a place to live, satisfied with their home as a place to live and feel safe when outside in their local area during the day. On average, life satisfaction in Herefordshire is similar to nationally. However, 10% express low life satisfaction, compared to 5% in the UK.

In terms of physical activity, Herefordshire is in line with the national averages across all three activity categories. 59% of Herefordshire adults are Active (150+ minutes per week), national average is 62%. 15% of adults are fairly active (30-149 minutes per week) national average is 13%. Finally 26% of adults are inactive (less than 30 minutes per week) national average is 25%. This means that are around 41,000 physically inactive adults in Herefordshire.

Bike to School Week June 3-7

Organised by the Sustrans charity. The week is designed to encourage parents and kids to start cycling to school.

Childhood obesity is a growing concern. Only 60 per cent of boys and 40 per cent of girls are getting the minimum of an hours' moderate physical activity a day they need to stay healthy. On average children now spend more time sat in a car travelling to school than the time allocated to physical education on the school curriculum. Currently only four per cent of children cycle to school. That's despite nearly half saying they'd like to and the vast majority living within a reasonable cycling distance. That more don't cycle is largely linked to safety concerns, but these are nowhere near as high as perceived. Cycling to school improves a child's physical health. They are also more alert, less stressed and sleep better. It helps improve a child's independence and self-confidence. There's even clear evidence that their academic performance improves. There are wider community benefits too. Cars on the school run account for about 20 per cent of traffic at the 8am-9am peak. They add to congestion, cause major parking and safety problems around the school gate and contribute to air pollution including nitrogen dioxide – a pollutant that stunts children's growth and increases risks of asthma and lung cancer.

Parents themselves also benefit. They don't have to spend time on the school run, an activity estimated to collectively cost them £520 million a year.

For more information on this, the Bromsgrove advertiser have written an article on the upcoming week (www.bromsgroveadvertiser.co.uk/news/regional/worcestershire/17667345.push-bike-clear-benefits-of-cycling-to-school/), alternatively head over to the Sustrans website to learn more about the week as well as the great work they're doing. www.sustrans.org.uk/

Tags: Herefordshire, Impact reports, Insight, May, Worcestershire

Posted: Wed, 01 May 2019 10:00 by Thomas Lawley

April - Active Lives release

April - Active Lives release

As April comes to a close, we look back on the highlights of the month just gone.

Record numbers more active! - Active Lives Adult Survey.

More than half a million adults are now active according to Sport England's Active Lives Survey published on April 11th. The most notable increases in participation has been seen in women, older adults, disabled people and those living with long-term health conditions.

Based on data gathered from November 2017-November 2018, a total of 498,100 more people (aged 16+) are meeting the Chief Medical Officer's guidelines of doing at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity a week compared to 12 months ago.

In addition to the increase in people classed as active, the number of inactive adults – those doing fewer than 30 minutes of physical activity a week – has reduced by 185,000.

These figures mean that 62.6% of the adult population are now classed as active, with 25.1% now inactive.

Our research also shows that enjoyment is the biggest motivator for the active while, for those who are not active, perceived ability has the biggest impact on how much they do.

The results, based on a sample of 180,000 members of the public, show specific increases in the number of active women, with a year-on-year increase of 286,000 thanks in part to efforts across the sport and physical activity sector to appeal to women.

This means the gender gap between numbers of men and women who are physically active, is continuing to narrow.

More locally it was a tale of sticking to the status quo with no significant increase or decrease in participation levels in any demographic.

Sit less, play more World Health Organisation (WHO) tells children

Children under five must spend less time sitting watching screens, or restrained in prams and seats, get better quality sleep and have more time for active play if they are to grow up healthy, according to new guidelines issued by the World Health Organisation.

The new recommendations at a glance are as follows;

Infants (less than 1 year) should:

  • Be physically active several times a day in a variety of ways, particularly through interactive floor-based play; more is better. For those not yet mobile, this includes at least 30 minutes in prone position (tummy time) spread throughout the day while awake.
  • Not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g. prams/strollers, high chairs, or strapped on a caregiver's back). Screen time is not recommended. When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged.
  • Have 14–17h (0–3 months of age) or 12–16h (4–11 months of age) of good quality sleep, including naps.

Children 1-2 years of age should:

  • Spend at least 180 minutes in a variety of types of physical activities at any intensity, including moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity, spread throughout the day; more is better.
  • Not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers, high chairs, or strapped on a caregiver's back) or sit for extended periods of time. For 1-year-olds, sedentary screen time (such as watching TV or videos, playing computer games) is not recommended. For those aged 2 years, sedentary screen time should be no more than 1 hour; less is better. When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged.
  • Have 11-14 hours of good quality sleep, including naps, with regular sleep and wake-up times.

Children 3-4 years of age should:

  • Spend at least 180 minutes in a variety of types of physical activities at any intensity, of which at least 60 minutes is moderate- to vigorous intensity physical activity, spread throughout the day; more is better.
  • Not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers) or sit for extended periods of time. Sedentary screen time should be no more than 1 hour; less is better. When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged.
  • Have 10–13h of good quality sleep, which may include a nap, with regular sleep and wake-up times.

Tags: Active Lives, April, Herefordshire, Insight, Worcestershire

Tom Lawley

Tom Lawley

Project Officer (Information and Insight)

  • Insight
  • Data analysis
  • Monitoring and evaluation
  • Active Lives
Telephone
01905 542380